Iteration13

March 31st, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Iteration13 is a structured multimedia improvisation employing an unorthodox performance ensemble whose roles are often turned upside down: a visual artist who generates sound by drawing, a tap dancer, and a musician who performs using a camera. Throughout the piece, performers’ parts appear to evolve, often cross-pollinating their domains and trajectories. The work explores structure and program as predominantly orthogonal, yet nonetheless mutually influencing streams. The continually evolving juxtaposition of abstract attack-based aural events produced by a tap and smooth gestures of an amplified pencil and their permutations (e.g. point-based attacks by pencil and a dragging foot gesture) seeks to assimilate seemingly polarized streams. Likewise, through the use of pencil gestures the piece investigates poignant contrasts among elements of nature, such as water and fire. This absoluteness is superimposed by a literal poetry and a soundtrack that punctuates the ending. In part inspired by the visual content, the closing section embodies sea waves splashing against the shores of a newly discovered world, a landing following a long and perilous voyage. iteration13 therefore can be seen as a theatrical audio-visual performance focusing on seamless integration of technology into an unconventional ensemble.

Excursion into Mixed Reality

March 31st, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Excursion Into Mixed Reality
Every day we interact with the digital world of computers and electronic media. We may consider this realm to be distinct from our experience
in the physical world. Excursion Into Mixed Reality explores the permeable boundary between these ‘realities’ by harnessing physical motion to create meaningful digital representations.
The dancer becomes the musical performer of a meta-instrument that extends bodily gestures into the realms of sound and video. Through a form of play, the dancer navigates the constantly shifting and parameterized digital environments that comprise the work. By linking different forms of media, the piece reveals underlying gestural similarities between motion,
imagery and sound.

Excursion Into Mixed Reality

Every day we interact with the digital world of computers and electronic media. We may consider this realm to be distinct from our experience in the physical world. Excursion Into Mixed Reality explores the permeable boundary between these ‘realities’ by harnessing physical motion to create meaningful digital representations. The dancer becomes the musical performer of a meta-instrument that extends bodily gestures into the realms of sound and video. Through a form of play, the dancer navigates the constantly shifting and parameterized digital environments that comprise the work. By linking different forms of media, the piece reveals underlying gestural similarities between motion, imagery and sound.

Nothing that is not there, and the nothing that is

March 31st, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is
In the mountains, wind and weather collide with land, each shaping the other in a sometimes subtle, sometimes violent pas de deux. Along the coast, this collision is more of a constant negotiation, the land and sea exchanging back and forth the clouds and temperatures that hover near the shoreline. In the flat interior, however, the wind and weather are themselves the instigators, the sculptors of an ephemeral topography of sound, texture,
and sensation.
The Snow Man One must have a mind of winter To regard the frost and the boughs Of the pine-trees crusted with snow; And have been cold a long time To behold the junipers shagged with ice, Of the January sun; and not to think Of any misery in the sound of the wind, In the sound of a few leaves, Which is the sound of the land Full of the same wind For the listener, who listens in the snow, And, nothing himself, beholds Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.
- Wallace Stevens, 1921

Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is

In the mountains, wind and weather collide with land, each shaping the other in a sometimes subtle, sometimes violent pas de deux. Along the coast, this collision is more of a constant negotiation, the land and sea exchanging back and forth the clouds and temperatures that hover near the shoreline. In the flat interior, however, the wind and weather are themselves the instigators, the sculptors of an ephemeral topography of sound, texture,and sensation.

The Snow Man One must have a mind of winter To regard the frost and the boughs Of the pine-trees crusted with snow; And have been cold a long time To behold the junipers shagged with ice, Of the January sun; and not to think Of any misery in the sound of the wind, In the sound of a few leaves, Which is the sound of the land Full of the same wind For the listener, who listens in the snow, And, nothing himself, beholds Nothing that is not there and the nothing that is.

- Wallace Stevens, 1921

Sawtooth

March 31st, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Sawtooth (2009) emphasizes multimedia and motion capture, integrating performance, sound, and animation into a unified experience. The musician’s physical gestures in space are captured by a video camera, and translated simultaneously into both music and animation.
As the action becomes more complex, the software underlying this process also begins to make autonomous contributions, adding new layers of audio-visual density, and creating new challenges for the improvising performer.

Sawtooth (2009) emphasizes multimedia and motion capture, integrating performance, sound, and animation into a unified experience. The musician’s physical gestures in space are captured by a video camera, and translated simultaneously into both music and animation.

As the action becomes more complex, the software underlying this process also begins to make autonomous contributions, adding new layers of audio-visual density, and creating new challenges for the improvising performer.

Bent Metal

March 30th, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Bent Metal explores an ambient soundscape of metallic sounds in a live-performance environment using performance software of his own design. Most of the source material comes from percussive improvisations on a bicycle, performed by adcbicycle via freesound.org.

Nostalgic Visions

March 30th, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Nostalgic Visions is a composition for piano and live, interactive electroacoustics inspired by a stanza of “Balada de la Placeta” (“Ballad of the Little Square”) from Libro de Poemas by Federico García-Lorca (English translation by Robert Bly):
Se ha llenado de luces mi corazón de seda, de campanas perdidas, de lirios y de abejas. Y yo me iré muy lejos, más allá de esas sierras, más allá de los mares, cerca de las estrellas, para perdirle a Cristo Señor que me devuelva mi alma Antigua de niño, madura de leyendas, con el gorro de plumas y el sable de madera.
My heart of silk is filled with lights, with lost bells, with lilies and bees.I will go very far, farther than those mountains, farther than the oceans, way up near the stars, to ask Christ the Lord to give back to me the soul I had as a child,matured by fairy tales, with its hat of feathers
and its wooden sword.
Garcia-Lorca’s text expresses the longing felt by one seeking a return to the innocence of youth. The poem’s dual time streams, the reality of pres- ent day and visions of the past, are expressed musically by the pianist who alternates between playing on the keys and inside the piano. At times present and past are clearly di- vided; other times the lines between them blur, and reminiscence becomes a hopeful yet impossible reality. Nostalgic Visions was commissioned by and is dedicated to pianist Thomas Rosenkranz.

Nostalgic Visions is a composition for piano and live, interactive electroacoustics inspired by a stanza of “Balada de la Placeta” (“Ballad of the Little Square”) from Libro de Poemas by Federico García-Lorca (English translation by Robert Bly):

Se ha llenado de luces mi corazón de seda, de campanas perdidas, de lirios y de abejas. Y yo me iré muy lejos, más allá de esas sierras, más allá de los mares, cerca de las estrellas, para perdirle a Cristo Señor que me devuelva mi alma Antigua de niño, madura de leyendas, con el gorro de plumas y el sable de madera.

My heart of silk is filled with lights, with lost bells, with lilies and bees.I will go very far, farther than those mountains, farther than the oceans, way up near the stars, to ask Christ the Lord to give back to me the soul I had as a child,matured by fairy tales, with its hat of feathers and its wooden sword.

Garcia-Lorca’s text expresses the longing felt by one seeking a return to the innocence of youth. The poem’s dual time streams, the reality of pres- ent day and visions of the past, are expressed musically by the pianist who alternates between playing on the keys and inside the piano. At times present and past are clearly di- vided; other times the lines between them blur, and reminiscence becomes a hopeful yet impossible reality. Nostalgic Visions was commissioned by and is dedicated to pianist Thomas Rosenkranz.

Usina Mekanica

March 26th, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Usina Mekanica Usina Mekanica (UM), is a conceptual new music/new media happening involving live musicians, kinetic objects and video generated in real time.  UM is performed by Fuse Ensemble in collaboration with Workingman Collective. Usina Mekanica uses live-action wind-up toys, their sound and images manipulated and reintegrated into the performance space via real-time video and audio to propose a psychological landscape for the audience.  UM is a multilayer performance that uses as source material the possible relations of man and machine while playing on childhood memories to trigger notions of nursery rhymes and the emotions provoked by the industrialized clanking of the metal wind up machines.  The soundscape created by live musicians and electronics evokes not a single memory but a mental landscape a context of the meanings held within childhood memories, real or invented.  The musicians of Fuse interact with the toys and the tactile sounds they create while the Toymaster directs. These wind-up machines move about on an elaborate kinetic table created by the Workingman Collective.  The table serves as a known communal space that bridges the two layers of invented psychological landscape and the mechanical devices themselves and follows the mechanical theme by being able to move on its own even becoming an instrument itself at one point.

Graffonic

March 26th, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Graffonic is a result from the technical process of production of an hyper-tool materialized under the form of an installation. This reactive work of art can be seen on a video projection, under the control of a video sign analysis system that cover all of the projection area. The user’s movement is quantified in numerical data which will be the intelligible  message for the machine. Accordingly, using its relative cognitive ability (supported by algorythmic processes), it will provide an audiovisual answer. The computer’s answer is grounded on a process of generative design in order to create an aesthetical reflex on a real time scale. Anyone, of any age can participate without effort in this generative audiovisual creative process. Graffonic interface don’t implies any kind of literacy, it functions simply as a common tin of “spray paint”. With the technology developed in Graffonic it is possible to practice graffiti, with no damage to the existing architecture. This installation pretends to be a space open to participation, leaving always the last decisions to the users before the final result of this work. Grafonic is an installation that results from a work presented by Rangel at Juliols summer course at Barcelona, July 2006. The content users/generators will be able to experience and explore the encounter with the machine in a human’s scale physical place. I intend that it should be used as a piece of urban furniture with entertaining purposes. Thus, the project might function as a kind of laboratory to the study of human behavior in the shape of a space free to the interaction with digital space.This is a performance in which users define the content and the variability of the control.

Festival Press Release, March 17

March 17th, 2010 | Filed under General

Announcing the Intermedia Festival: Indianapolis, April 23-25
The Intermedia Festival (http://music.iupui.edu/intermedia/) is a unique series of concerts and events presenting futuristic modes of artistic performance. The Intermedia Festival will highlight new telematic and media arts performed by artists throughout North America and Europe. Telematic art synthesizes live traditional performing arts with computers, media and telecommunications. While more than 100 performers will travel to Indianapolis, others will participate through the Internet interactively with collaborators at the festival. Events for the Festival will be held in the new downtown Indianapolis Public Library and in the Informatics and Computer Technology Complex at IUPUI.  Admission is free and open to the public for all events.

“We want the public to be involved in this event and particularly hope that other artists embrace this Festival and come to learn and explore new ways of doing things,” said Scott Deal, a professor at IUPUI’s Department of Music and Arts Technology and the director of the Festival. “As an artist, one is always hoping to present work in a way that gets people thinking. Our hope is that the Festival audience takes away a renewed sense of potential.” For IUPUI’s Department of Music and Arts Technology, this festival is a departmental effort involving faculty and students. The festival will also involve collaborating with a variety of community arts groups such as Dance Kaleidoscope and Butler University Dance Program.

Concerts
The Festival will present ten media-rich concerts between Friday evening and Sunday afternoon, April 23-25. Live dance, music, visual arts, drama, videography, scientific presentation, commentary and discussion will come together to create a provocative and compelling set of experiences. Noted guest artists featured at the Festival will include San Francisco-based singer Pamela Z, New York composer and computer artist Luke Dubois, singer Bora Yoon, eco-acoustic composer Matthew Burtner, Indianapolis-based electro-acoustic ensemble Big Robot, and Dance Kaleidoscope. The Friday evening opening concert will feature Pamela Z followed by a Dance concert that will feature the Indianapolis-based Dance Kaleidoscope in concert with other dancers and media onstage, and with dancers from Florida State University interacting online and on-screen.

Installations
Several groups will be presenting mobile art installations throughout the Festival in the downtown vicinity.  The Washington DC-based Floating Lab Collective will present their work titled “Scream At The Economy”, a participatory project that invites people to call a phone number and scream at the economy. The archived screams will be recorded as mp3 files. The musical composition will be played in the “screamer”, a portable speaker system, that will perform in public spaces. The Florida-based Mobile Performance Group is a collective of new media artists who disseminate their works by using automobiles, video projection, cell phones, FM transmission, wireless hotspots, and any other technologies that allow artists to engage the public. The Occupation Forces Project, by New York artists Mark Skwarek, Joseph Hocking, and Serial Krusher, is a piece that simulates of an invasion of earth by an alien occupation force. The project will be a free, downloadable, mobile application or projected augmented reality, which will allow users to view an alien invasion army through their mobile devices at various stations throughout the Indianapolis Library and in the downtown area. Portuguese computer-artist Andre Rangel will present “Graffonic”, a work utilizing video tracking and laser pointers to assist participants in creating a reactive work of art.

Fixed Media Works
The Virtual Reality Theater (VRT) at IUPUI is a 3-D environment in which interactive and immersive art works will be presented, created specifically for this space in the ICTC building at IUPUI.  Additionally, screenings of cutting-edge video pieces that combine visual art with music and sound will occur at Library. New York computer artist and composer Luke Dubois and IU Bloomington Professor Margaret Dolinsky will present multi-media works in spaces inside the public library downtown. The Festival will also highlight the work of over a dozen video artists from throughout North America, including notable artists such as Phil Kline, Maggie Payne, and Tom Lopez.

Additional Information
The Intermedia Festival is made possible by an Indiana University New Frontiers grant from the Lilly Foundation. The Festival is being produced in partnership with the Indianapolis Marion County Public Library, the Indiana University Advanced Visualization Lab (AVL), and the Donald Tavel Arts and Technology Research Center, “We want the public to be involved in this event and particularly hope that other artists embrace this Festival and come to learn and explore new ways of doing things,” said Scott Deal, a professor at IUPUI’s Department of Music and Arts Technology and the director of the Festival. “As an artist, one is always hoping to present work in a way that gets people thinking. Our hope is that the Festival audience takes away a renewed sense of potential.” For IUPUI’s Department of Music and Arts Technology, this festival is a departmental effort involving faculty and students. The festival will also involve collaborating with a variety of community arts groups such as Dance Kaleidoscope and Butler University Dance Program. and the Music and Arts Technology Department at IUPUI. Free tickets for the Intermedia Festival will be available in April, or at the door during the festival.

Over 100 performing artists will travel to Indianapolis to present their works.  In addition to the featured guest artists, participants will be coming from Vancouver, New York, Lisbon Portugal, Chicago, Washington DC, Yale University, Oberlin College, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, University of Virginia, Florida State University, University of Miami, Duke University, Bowling Green University, Temple University, Emory University and Virginia Tech University, to name a few.  Regional participants will include artists from institutions such as IUPUI, Indiana University Bloomington, Ball State University, Butler University, University of Kentucky, University of Louisville, and University of Cincinnati.  Telematic performances between artists over the Internet will occur as a result of new technologies developed in the Telematics Lab at the Donald Tavel Arts Technology Research Center at IUPUI.

Auksalaq

March 12th, 2010 | Filed under Abstracts

Auksalaq, the Inupiaq Eskimo word for “melting snow”, is a telematic, multimedia work that explores global climate change from a northern geographic and cultural perspective. Using distance technology, live music, dance, movement, visual arts and commentary, the work creates a rich counterpoint of media linking great distances. Auksalaq will integrate artistic expression, scientific information and social/political commentary to present an interactive, multi-dimensional experience that embodies relevant complex cultural and empirical processes. The piece illuminates scientific analysis as well as cultural and political issues surrounding global climate change.

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